Tag Archives: scanning

Returning to Film Photography (and to blogging)

For the last couple of years I’ve shot the images you see on the main site – http://www.redcentphotography.com –  with digital cameras. For some applications such as long exposures and a few other specialty applications, I still shoot quite a bit with the Fuji X Pro 1 and XE-1 that have been my bread and butter since 2012. When I do paid work, the digital cameras are still the correct tool.

For the rest, though, I’m choosing to shoot more film. 

The cameras are wonderful to hold, to operate, to own. Using them helps remind me that there was a time before. Before everything became a question of ‘Right now.’ Fast. Faster. Immediacy.

It has its place, but not when I’m shooting and enjoying some time to myself.

The way I learned to shoot was to grab the camera, pick up a small box with a roll of film contained in an even smaller plastic container. It smelled funny when you removed the lid. You’d diddle around with the film until it loaded correctly…which could take a few tries.


Advance the film via that lever under your right thumb. Look through the viewfinder at your scene, cast around that scene using an analog meter (or no meter), adjust shutter speed dial, aperture dial or both. Don’t think too much. Press the shutter release. That was it.

 Back then, there was no way to indulge the compulsion to check the work. No immediate sharing to social media and/or immediate gratification. There was no digital, no LCD. There was no social media. No likes. No comments. Not much of anything until much later.

There is a great deal of freedom in that. There is a great deal of freedom in not knowing what precisely is on a roll of film that may have been in the camera for a week or more until you remove it from the developing reel.

The throughput has gone down, but my process and enjoyment have improved. I would like to think that the image making is improving, as well.

Developing my own black and white film at home is a meditative process that has been practiced by photographers around the world for decades. I find it soothing to complete the development of a roll of film, hang it, check it out under a loupe, scan it and see on a larger screen whether it represents what I saw.

More later.

 

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